Reflexology, wellbeing around YOUR needs

Reflexology: what are the benefits of reflexology, kinds of reflexology, methods of reflexology

What may reflexology help you with?

If you suffer from a medical condition, reflexology may help heal or alleviate the condition.

Even if you do not suffer from any medical condition, as it addresses the mind, the spirit and the body, reflexology may be very effective to maintain health and as a preventive health care.

Reflexology is more than a relaxation therapy as it encourages the restoration of the energy within the body to bring about a healing response to many a condition such as stress, insomnia, IBS, pain, etc.

Reflexology helps to sustain a natural equilibrium to take place by applying pressure to certain points on the hands, on the feet or on the face that corresponds to organs, glands, muscles, tissues and cells in the body; it is much mor than a foot massage, a hand massage or a face massage. This therapy helps to balance mind, body and spirit.

Applying pressure to the feet, hands or face can make a difference if :

  • you suffer from stress,
  • you suffer from anxiety,
  • you have been injured,
  • you have a chronic condition,
  • you are not sleeping properly,
  • your hormones are out of balance,
  • you are feeling low,
  • and much more.

Health is more than the absence of dis-ease or infirmity. It is the state of complete physical, mental and social well-being. A reflexology session assists you towards a better quality of health. During a session:

  • people usually feel more rejuvenated and energised
  • reflexology helps relieve pain and this makes a person feel good and relaxed
  • blood circulation and nerve conduction is improved
  • the body systems are encouraged to balance
  • the natural healing power of the body is stimulated

Reflexology is a holistic touch therapy that promotes equilibrium and well-being. It nudges the body towards balance and helps the body reset its mechanisms into a state of health. As a reflexologist, my aim is to restore equilibrium in a holistic way.

What are the different kinds of reflexology?

There exist different kinds of reflexology: foot, face, hand and ear reflexology.

I have training in:


and those are the kinds of reflexology I offer at Holibrium.

During a foot, face or hand reflexology session, the therapist makes sure the client is comfortable and music might be played in the background.

Foot reflexology

During a foot reflexology session, the therapist works in front of the client who is lying on a coach or reclining in a chair.

In foot reflexology, the structures and organs of the body are mapped on the feet and located via a system of horizontal and vertical zones.

Reflex points are worked on the soles of the feet, the top of the feet as well as the lower legs, depending on the technique(s) used. Depending on the information given at the beginning of your session, one method or a combination of methods will be used.

I offer:

  • a full foot reflexology session
  • foot reflexology combined with a stress face reflexology
  • foot reflexology combined with hand reflexology
  • a foot, face and hand reflexology session

Face reflexology

Face or facial reflexology is a kind of reflexology that involves working on reflex points on the face with the therapist working behind the client.

In face reflexology the structures and organs of the body are imposed on the face. The Bergman method, devised by Ziggie Bergman is based on the Zone therapy by Dr William Fitzgerald.

Face reflexology has unique benefits: it promotes the production of new skin tissues and improves skin tone. Hence, it makes you look better and gives a healthy glow.

I offer:

  • a full facial reflexology sequence
  • a stress sequence combined with foot reflexology
  • a stress sequence combined with hand reflexology
  • a face, foot and hand reflexology session
  • a face session as part of a Zone Face Lift session

Hand reflexology

Hand reflexology is a kind of reflexology performed on the palms and backs of the hands.

It is pleasant, deeply relaxing and effective. It can be more convinient than foot and face reflexology. It also suits better if you do not like your feet touched, you are ticklish, you have very sweaty feet,you have sores on your feet and legs, you have broken your feet or legs, you have lost a limb.

During hand reflexology, the client sits back in a reclining chair. The therapist sits either diagonally opposite the client or opposite one another.

Hand reflexology has a positive effect on conditions that affect the hands and wrists: for example, it is known to alleviate discomfort and pain with carpal tunnel syndrome, repetitive strain injury, arthritis. It may help overused and tired hands; it may also help recovering from a hand injury, maintaining dexterity in hand, etc.

Self-help is usually performed on the hands. Your reflexologist might suggest reflex points for you to work on in between sessions. This ensures you get the most out of your sessions and allows you to be a part in your own health.

I offer:

  • a full hand reflexology sequence
  • face reflexology combined with a stress face sequence
  • hand reflexology combined with foot reflexology
  • a hand, foot and face reflexology session

What are the different reflexology methods?

Reflexology aims to help your entire body function at its optimal level. It is a therapy that comes in many forms and with a wide range of methods and approaches: reclining reflexology, vertical reflex therapy (VRT®), reflexology lymph drainage (RLD), Advanced reflexology techniques (ART®), Touchpoint reflexology techniques, Integrative Reflexology®, etc.

At the beginning of your session we will discuss which approach or approaches is or are the most appropriate to your needs. I offer the following foot reflexology methods.

Reflexology routine
Basic routine
by Renée Tanner
Relaxation, balance, hormone balance, cleansing of toxins, less pain, etc.
Vertical Reflex Therapy
VRT®
by Lynne Booth
Mobility issues, self-help, etc.
Reflexology Lymph Drainage
RLD
by Sally Kay
Lymphodema, auto-immune issues, allergies, etc.
Advanced Reflexology Training
ART®
by Anthony Porter
Many conditions, prevention, sinus issues
Touchpoint Techniques
by Dorthe Krogsgaard
and Peter Frandsen
shoulder, neck, foot, spine, stress
Integrative Reflexology®
by Claire Miller
Lymph circulation, calming effect, toxin clearance, etc.

For more information regarding the different reflexology techniques, please click here.

See more
More information about the basic reflexology routine

This reflexology routine was put together by Renée Tanner.

Reflexology is almost always effective and brings numerous positive results. You will feel lifted, energised, peaceful, centered, pampered and will enjoy prolonged health benefit.

You can receive reflexology because you suffer from a condition. You can also enjoy a reflexology session as a prevention to maintain balance and, hence, stay healthy.

Basic routines, which involved a 'walking' type of technique are often termed conventional reflexology. They can be received on their own or combined with other methods.

More information about VRT

Vertical Reflex Therapy (VRT®) or Vertical Reflexology was developed by Lynne Booth.

In this method, points are stimulated while the feet or hands are weight bearing; the hands and the feet can also be worked together. The VRT techniques are usually applied at the beginning and at the end of your reflexology session.

VRT stimulates the body to make positive changes and helps with releasing and getting rid of harmful toxins.

More information about RLD, Sally Kay® Method

Reflexology lymph drainage (RLD) was developed by Sally Kay. It targets the lymphatic system to promote drainage of lymphatic fluid via the feet. It can be used to reduce lymphoedema after treatment for breast cancer; it also works very well with inflammatory auto-immune disorders, fibromyalgia, colds and other conditions.

RLD is researched based and you can read more about this on Sally Kay's website

RLD can be used as a treatment on its own or combined with other reflexology techniques.

More information about ART

Advanced Reflexology Techniques or Alternative Reflexology Rechniques (ART®) was put together by Anthony Porter.

The techniques (sliding, rotary movement, puslsing, rubbing, constant presure) used are more concentrated and generally deeper than other reflexology techniques. Those techniques stay within the client's pain tolerance.

More information about Touchpoint Techniques

The techniques by Dorthe Krogsgaard and Peter Lund Frandsen are related to specific health problems. Drawing on their experience, they select reflex points and techniques they have found effective to help with problems such as neck and shoulder problems, stress issues, foot problems, etc.

Their techniques combine classical, nerve reflexology (working the bony parts of the feet to stimulate the nervous system) and the Karl-Axel Lind Method. They also include other techniques tested and of help to specific conditions such as trigger points, orthobionomy manipulation, etc.

More information about Integrative Reflexology®

Integrative Reflexology® was devised by Claire Miller. It is a form of foot and hand reflexology based on four theories: Structural Alignment, Zones, Meridians and Psychoneuroimmunology.

Integrative Reflexology uses whole-hand strokes and works on the body, the feet and/or hands to enhance relaxation and therapeutic effects.

Reflexology routine
Basic routine
by Renée Tanner
Relaxation, balance, hormone balance, cleansing of toxins, less pain, etc.
More information about the basic reflexology routine

This reflexology routine was put together by Renée Tanner.

Reflexology is almost always effective and brings numerous positive results. You will feel lifted, energised, peaceful, centered, pampered and will enjoy prolonged health benefits.

You can receive reflexology because you suffer from a condition. You can also enjoy a reflexology session as a prevention to maintain balance and, hence, stay healthy.

Basic routines, which involved a 'walking' type of technique are often termed conventional reflexology. They can be received on their own or combined with other methods.

Vertical Reflex Therapy
VRT®
by Lynne Booth
Mobility issues, self-help, etc.
More information about VRT

Vertical Reflex Therapy (VRT®) or Vertical Reflexology was developed by Lynne Booth.

In this method, points are stimulated while the feet or hands are weight bearing; the hands and the feet can also be worked together. The VRT techniques are usually applied at the beginning and at the end of your reflexology session.

VRT stimulates the body to make positive changes and helps with releasing and getting rid of harmful toxins.

Reflexology Lymph Drainage
RLD
by Sally Kay
Lymphodema, auto-immune issues, allergies, etc.
More information about RLD, Sally Kay® Method

Reflexology lymph drainage (RLD) was developed by Sally Kay. It targets the lymphatic system to promote drainage of lymphatic fluid via the feet. It can be used to reduce lymphoedema after treatment for breast cancer; it also works very well with inflammatory auto-immune disorders, fibromyalgia, colds and other conditions.

RLD is researched based and you can read more about this on Sally Kay's website

RLD can be used as a treatment on its own or combined with other reflexology techniques.

Advanced Reflexology Training
ART®
by Anthony Porter
Many conditions, prevention, sinus issues
More information about ART

Advanced Reflexology Techniques or Alternative Reflexology Techniques (ART®) was put together by Anthony Porter.

The techniques (sliding, rotary movement, puslsing, rubbing, constant presure) used are more concentrated and generally deeper than other reflexology techniques. Those techniques stay within the client's pain tolerance.

Touchpoint Techniques
by Dorthe Krogsgaard and Peter Frandsen
shoulder, neck, foot, spine, stress
More information about Touchpoint Techniques

The techniques by Dorthe Krogsgaard and Peter Lund Frandsen are related to specific health problems. Drawing on their experience, they select reflex points and techniques they have found effective to help with problems such as neck and shoulder problems, stress issues, foot problems, etc.

Their techniques combine classical, nerve reflexology (working the bony parts of the feet to stimulate the nervous system) and the Karl-Axel Lind Method. They also include other techniques tested and of help to specific conditions such as trigger points, orthobionomy manipulation, etc.

Integrative Reflexology®
by Claire Miller
Lymph circulation, calming effect, toxin clearance, etc.
More information about Integrative Reflexology®

Integrative Reflexology® was devised by Claire Miller. It is a form of foot and hand reflexology based on four theories: Structural Alignment, Zones, Meridians and Psychoneuroimmunology.

Integrative Reflexology uses whole-hand strokes and works on the body, the feet and/or hands to enhance relaxation and therapeutic effects.



For more information about my continual professional training, go and check my about page or click here.

Why choose reflexology?

Time for YOU

A reflexology session brings you time for yourself. It can be your 'me time', your time to reflect, your time to relax, your time to sort things out.

A reflexology session focuses on the person: a reflexologist deals first and foremost with a person and not only the symptoms. If we consider stress, for example, what is stressful to one person might be motivation for another. A reflexology session is tailored to the individual and does not operate on the one-size-fit-all precept.

Individual care and attention combined with relaxation, often deep relaxation, provides optimum condition for your journey towards health physically and mentally.

The healing power of the body

Reflexology stimulates the inner healing powers that all individuals possess.

Our body has a remarkable capacity for regeneration. Our body possesses restorative and immune powers. Complementary therapies, such as reflexology, help us to come back to a favourable environment that promotes an increase in energy and a harmonious balance within the different systems in the body. The brain then deals with the information and sends back signals to the concerned organ, structure, zone.

Received on a regular basis, reflexology helps restore balance in the body by stimulating the healing process through the cooperation between the therapist and the client. When the healing potential of a client is triggered, this will very likely lead to symptoms being alleviating.

The power of touch while receiving reflexology

Reflexology is a touch therapy that is deep and gentle. The power of touch is universally recognised.

Indeed, touch is vital for our emotional and physical health. As we know, a hug a day feels good. When the body enjoys a nurturing touch, it promotes an increase in the release of oxytocin, a calming hormone.

The contact with the therapist's hands, their touch, releases endomorphins, chemical substances or neurotransmitters, that are responsible for our feelings of pleasure and stimulates the production of T cells that are important for our immune system.

Touch also helps secreting melatonin, a naturally occurring brain substance that has an effect on our mood.

Towards a more balanced you

Reflexology is a natural medicine that helps dislodge energetic blocks.

As such it helps people increase their energy levels and re-establish the necessary balance so that all the body systems function harmoniously. This state is called homeostasis.

Reflexology favours wellbeing and can be a big help to cope with life.

Towards a calmer you

During a reflexology session, the mind almost always calms down. While relaxing we are able to 'let go' physically and emotionally and hence be on our way for recovery.

What happens during a reflexology session?

What to expect during a reflexology session?

Your session is composed of a talk, the treatment and questions/feedback.

For your first session, you will have to answer a detailed questionnaire. It is a preliminary talk to determine present and past health as well as lifestyle. All information given will remain confidential and treated according to the Data Protection Act. When the client is a child the child's parent or guardian must complete the questionnaire and sign it, giving their consent for the session.

The therapy will be given while you are reclining or standing/sitting weight-bearing (vertical reflex therapy).

The session will be tailored to your needs.

You will be asked to take your shoes and socks off; for facial reflexology I will also ask you to take off your ear rings and necklace if you have not done so in advance; for hand reflexology, I will ask you to take your rings off and to fold your sleeves up.

Your feet, your hands or your face will be examined followed by a session using gentle special thumb and finger pressure techniques or strokes, on the soles of your feet, on the palms of your hands or on your face.

Will I have any reaction(s) during a reflexology session?

People react differently during a reflexology treatment. Most reactions indicate a release of toxins into the system and how the body copes with them.

The reactions you may experience during a session include:

  • feeling cold suddently
  • painful points
  • sweating of palms or soles
  • coughing
  • laughing
  • sighing
  • crying, groaning
  • twitching or tingling in the limbs
  • warmth in the area treated
  • desire to sleep
  • temporary pain
  • disappearance of pain

What happens after a reflexology session?

Is there any reaction after a reflexology session?

There can be reactions after a reflexology session. Should they be a concern to you do not hesitate to get in touch with your therapist.

Reflexology works on:

  • on the physical body
  • and also on the emotional and mental levels

A reaction is a positive sign that the therapy is working and is a natural outcome of the treatment. You may experience a range of reactions after a session:

  • a reduction in the symptoms you were having
  • worsening of the symptoms (usually lasts 24 hours; if you are concerned, contact your therapist)
  • better/more sleep than usual
  • a state of deep relaxation
  • a runny nose
  • more energy
  • feeling wonderful
  • tiredness

All the above reactions are due to the body's own healing and elimination process. Reflexology does not cause illnesses . Indeed an illness is preceded by an incubation period (that may last a couple of days or longer) before the illness becomes apparent; a cold is not the outcome of a reflexology session.

How long to notice the benefits?

The effects can be immediate or delayed: they appear 24-48 hours after a session.

How many sessions do I need? Do I need more than one session?

To obtain the best results treatments are best received a couple of times a week, weekly or fortnightly, depending on the severity of the symptoms.

The body self-healing mechanisms almost always require more than one reflexology sessions before you can notice a definitive change in a condition or in your well-being.

For best results a reflexology session should be carried out 6 to 8 times weekly. Afterwards it is recommanded to receive a treatment fortnighly for a couple of treatments then once a month to help maintain the balance and to prevent problems from reoccurring.

However the frequency of a treatment also depends on the age, fitness, sensitivity and financial situation of the person. In some instances sessions times are reduced (Infants, toddlers for example).

After a few sessions your reflexologist will assess the situation and you can decide together what is the best course of action.

Information on complementary therapy, cure and diagnosis

Is reflexology a complentary therapy?

Reflexology is classified as a complementary therapy.

Reflexology is a natural non-invasive complementary therapy which brings positive effects in people's life.. It works very well alongside orthodox or conventional medicine and does not replace it. See the following article where a reflexologist works with doctors in a surgery.

A reflexology treatment provides a holistic treatment, that is:

  • you are going to be treated as a whole: not only the symptoms you might be experiencing
  • but also you emotional well-being
  • and your social well-being

Experiencing reflexology is deeply relaxing and de-stressing.

Does reflexology cure?

A reflexologist cannot claim offering a cure for an illness or a disease.

A reflexologist is not a qualified practictioner and does not treat or work with a treatment orientation (as understood when going to a surgery). S/he treats the whole person (holistic approach) by stimulating the nerve endings on the soles of the feet or the palms of the hands. A reflexology treatment aims at the client reaching a holistic balance on his/her health.

A reflexologist cannot claim offering a cure for an illness as such is not her/his role. However, a reflexology treatment may help alleviating the symptoms of an illness/disease. More than one sessions might be required depending on the severity of the symptoms, on how the body gets back into balance.

Does a reflexologist diagnose?

No, a reflexologist does not diagnose.

A diagnosis is the art of identifying a disease from its signs and symptoms, or a statement resulting from this. Medically qualified doctors do make diagnoses as they receive appropriate training for doing so.

A reflexologist does not and cannot diagnose as s/he is not a medically qualified doctor. Reflexology is not diagnostic tool and cannot used to diagnose. A reflexologist does not treat specific diseases and does not cure (only the body can do so).

What a reflexologist can do is describe an ailment in terms of energy imbalance. S/he uses what is called a differential diagnosis drawn upon signs, symptoms, observation of the feet, assessment of life-style, of stress, of mental well-being.

Reflexology: theory, origins and today

What is the theory behind reflexology?

The theory behind reflexology is that all the structures and organs of the body are represented on the soles of the feet, the palms of the hands, the face or the ears.

Reflexology, whether received on the feet, on the face or on the hands involves the application of gentle pressure to reflex points located on all parts of the feet, face or hands. This discipline accompanies people, provides relaxation and views the person as a whole: structurally (bones, muscles, nerves, organs, liquids), emotionally and mentally.

Reflexology contributes to a person's wellbeing and hence helps to fight off the effect of stress and dis-ease.

What are the origins of reflexology?

Where does reflexology come from? Is it possible to pinpoint the origins of reflexology? What we do know is that reflexology is ancestral in origin and that many ancient cultures connect the health of the body with the health of the feet.

Research has shown that Chinese were using 5000 years ago a form of pressure therapy involving fingers and thumbs that also involves rubbing.

Egyptians used foot massages as shown on the fresco of one of the tombs in Saqqarah. The painting describes a person receiving a treatment with pressure applied to the feet and hands in a way that seems similar to reflexology.

When reflexology was introduced in the West, it was not as a form of energy medicine as such and was based on the physiological concepts of reflexes and the nervous system.

Reflexology more recently

In the 1920s Dr William Fitzgerald, a surgeon in Connecticut, begins research on what he calls zone therapy. He will divide the body into 10 zones (5 on each side of a median line).

In the 30s, an American Eunice Ingham who wrote Stories the feet can tell , and Stories the feet have told put together foot maps. Her work forms the basis of modern reflexology, a reflexology still on an empirical level and non-scientific as it lacks anatomical and physiological bases.

Today we can say that reflexology is a science as it is based on physiological and neurological study. For example, since the end of the 1960s, Dr Faure-Alderson, uses her medical knowledge to bring more precision on how to locate the zones and the reflex points on the feet. Medical knowledge is also used to locate reflexes by Dorthe Krogsgaard and Peter Frandsen (Touchpoint techniques).






Contact Sylvie

+44 (0)75 75 86 23 86
sylvie@holibrium.com

Direction to Stoke Gifford, North Bristol

Picture of a foot

This page was last modified on Jul 07 2020 2:15pm